CATEGORY

Foil Stamp

RANK


PRODUCTION DETAILS

Quantity

1,000 to 2,000

Page Count

Paper Stock

Foodgrade, Greyback

Number of Colors

1

Dimensions

X-Large: 10.43 × 10.43 × 2.36
Large: 8.26 × 8.26 × 3.93
Single: 4.13 × 4.13 × 3.54
Macaron: 5.90 × 5.90 × 1.57

Binding

Special Techniques


ADDL. DESIGN CREDITS

Creative Director

Karen Huang

Designers

Lui Yiling, Lee Suyeon

Production

New Box Manufacturing Company


ADDL. PRODUCTION CREDITS


TAGS

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LINKS

Manic Design

Packaging by Manic Design for Tart BlancPackaging by Manic Design for Tart BlancPackaging by Manic Design for Tart BlancPackaging by Manic Design for Tart BlancPackaging by Manic Design for Tart BlancPackaging by Manic Design for Tart Blanc

CLIENT

Tart Blanc is an arti­sanal bak­ery in Sin­ga­pore spe­cial­is­ing in beau­ti­ful tarts fea­tur­ing inven­tive flavour and tex­ture com­bi­na­tions. The own­ers, a pair of sis­ters, one of whom is the baker, tell us that they dream of multi-layered con­fec­tions explod­ing with fla­vors and textures.


BRIEF

Instead of rely­ing on overly orna­men­tal scripts emblem­atic of the French, Amer­i­can, or Euro­pean aesthetic—which would not have been authen­tic for them—the client wanted some­thing clean and neu­tral. They are all about flavour com­bi­na­tion, exper­i­men­ta­tion, and inven­tion and wanted a blank slate to show­case their creations.


APPROACH

To under­line the tartistry of the baked goods, we came up with the name tart blanc inspired by the phrase carte blanche, which means blank paper and expresses the idea that any­thing is pos­si­ble. For the pack­ag­ing and name­cards, we chose an unusual and raw grey sub­strate as an alter­na­tive to the ubiq­ui­tous kraft to hint at the human-made, small batch nature of the bak­ery. It took us a very long time to con­vince the box maker to make the boxes in this mate­r­ial but we think that the results are worth every minute try­ing to get it right.

PRODUCTION LESSONS

We first tried to print the boxes with white ink, even though we knew that it would not be opaque enough. We thought that we could try mul­ti­ple passes to get the cov­er­age we wanted. We first tried two, then three, then four passes of white ink on the grey board sub­strate. None of it worked. The paper sim­ply drank up the ink and even started to warp. It was just too porous. In the end, we hot­stamped with white foil instead, which meant we had to com­pro­mise on the design a little.

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